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Accessible PowerPoint

3 simple things to do to make your presentations accessible

Making Accessible Presentations - A person working on a laptop

Microsoft PowerPoint is one of the most used tools to create presentations for different business requirements. Various meetings and conferences are conducted using these presentations. The information through PowerPoint is conveyed in the form of text, images, graphics, tables and charts. Looking at today’s requirement where people are globally connected, these presentations need to be accessible too. I am sure you must be interested to know how to do the PPTs accessible. 

Let’s discuss 3 simple things that each of us can do to make sure that the PowerPoint presentation is accessible to people with disabilities.   

  1. Use the correct Slide Template 

The most important thing to do is to start with the right foundation. PowerPoint provides multiple slide templates. Choosing the correct slide template is key to ensure that the information on slide have correct structure and reading order.  

  1. Slide Title 

Another important aspect is to make sure that the unique and descriptive titles are provided for every slide. Such that users can understand what purpose of the slide and screen reader users can navigate through the slide easily. 

  1. Slide Reading Order 

Think of, that screen reader reads the content of the slide in the order they are added to the presentation. This order may vary from the content order which visually appears. So, you can check the reading order by selecting  

  • Home-> Arrange-> Selection Pane and the Selection Pane appears.
Selection Pane screenshot

Tip: The content can be reordered simply by clicking and dragging the object in the desired sequence. 

Email us to explore more on how to make Accessible PowerPoint Presentations. For document remediation reach to 247 Accessible Documents

By Ramya Venkitesh

Head - Accessibility New Initiatives, Actively involved in formulating new ideas to create Innovative Accessible Solutions across all Disabilities.